How to build a business – Managing Customer Tasks

Several times a year we organize “What’s Qooking” events, where professionals in our network share their ideas on themes that interest them, while cooking our own food.

Last week we had Gerry McGovern as our guest. Gerry is the founder and CEO of Customer Carewords and an authority on increasing Web satisfaction by managing customer tasks (more about that later).

His clients include: the Tetra Pak, HSBC, Microsoft, IBM, Cisco, UK Ministry of Justice, and the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

 

Gerry speaks, writes and consults on web content management. He has been doing this since 1994. His latest book, The Stranger’s Long Neck: How to Deliver What Your Customers Really Want Online, was published in June 2010.

 

Gerry propagates and uses a quantitative method, which results in changes in website navigation and content that transform websites into profitable tools. He has done this for customer-oriented websites, business partner portals, and intranets.

Gerry is a funny person, full of stories from practical experience. He is the ultimate wake-up call for everyone involved in creating and improving websites. He will not stop stressing the importance of Facts Not Opinions. This is a generic problem he touches. In any business, but especially in consulting we are short in facts, long in opinions.

Another one that Gerry uses in his book on website, but where you can replace websites with businesses: “If there’s one reason more than any other that Web sites fail, it is because the web teams managing them lack understanding of, nd empathy for, their customers. The customer is a stranger (…)”

Whatever you intuitively think is right, usually has a negative effect

 

 

Web task management is about managing your website around top tasks. Success is measured on the ability of customers to quickly and easily complete these top tasks.

Traditional website management focuses on managing the technology and/or the content.

 

These management approaches fail because they manage and measure the wrong things. If you manage from a technology perspective, then the metrics are nearly always volume-based. It’s about the number of documents that are published, or the number of searches that are carried out.

 

Managing from a content perspective is even more volume-based. Many senior managers are still quoting the utterly useless measure, HITS. (HITS stands for “How Idiots Track Success.”)

 

Task management is based on the idea that your customers come to your website to complete top tasks as quickly and simply as possible. It measures success by how quickly your customers can complete these tasks.

 

Web task management measures success based on a simple question: Was your customer able to quickly complete the task they came to your website to complete? Answering this question demands a very different website management approach.

 

This is interesting stuff for marketeers, and one of the most important lessons would be: “Offline is for getting attention, online is for giving attention”, but in general the fact-based practical approach to Why we are doing things in business, and how we measure success is something all business should focus on. In one of the next Qhuba blogs I will focus on Benefits Management, another area of expertise that many companies don’t spend too much time on.

Strange phenomenon: thousands of projects are started, based on business cases, but for very few projects the outcomes and benefits realized are measured. Room for improvement.


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